Kaillie Humphries: Bobsled| Husband| Where does live

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Kelly Humphries (born Kelly Simmundson, September 4, 1985) is a Canadian-American bobsledder.Today we will discuss about Kaillie Humphries: Bobsled| Husband| Where does live.

 

Kaillie Humphries: Bobsled| Husband| Where does live

Kelly Humphries (born Kelly Simmundson, September 4, 1985) is a Canadian-American bobsledder. Representing Canada, she was the 2010 and 2014 Olympic champion in two-woman bobsled and the 2018 Olympic bronze medalist alongside breakwoman Phylicia George. With her victory in 2014, she became the first female bobsledder to defend her Olympic title and was named flag bearer for the Olympic closing ceremony along with breakwoman Heather Moyse.

Kaillie Humphries in Altenberg (2020)
Personal information
Nationality Canadian, American
Born September 4, 1985 (age 36)[1]
CalgaryAlberta
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)[1]
Weight 76 kg (168 lb)[1]
Sport
Country United States
Sport Bobsleigh
Event(s) Two-women, Monobob
Coached by Stefan Bosch
Achievements and titles
Olympic finals 1st place, gold medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) 1st place, gold medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
Medal record
 
Representing the  United States
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2022 Beijing Monobob
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 2020 Altenberg Two-woman
Gold medal – first place 2021 Altenberg Two-woman
Gold medal – first place 2021 Altenberg Monobob
Representing  Canada
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2010 Vancouver Two-woman
Gold medal – first place 2014 Sochi Two-woman
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Pyeongchang Two-woman
World Championships
Gold medal – first place 2012 Lake Placid Two-woman
Gold medal – first place 2013 St. Moritz Two-woman
Silver medal – second place 2008 Altenberg Mixed team
Silver medal – second place 2016 Igls Two-woman
Silver medal – second place 2017 Königssee Two-woman
Bronze medal – third place 2011 Königssee Two-woman
Bronze medal – third place 2011 Königssee Mixed team
Bronze medal – third place 2012 Lake Placid Mixed team
Bronze medal – third place 2013 St. Moritz Mixed team
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Winterberg Mixed

Bobsled

Kaillie Humphries: Bobsled| Husband| Where does live

 

Humphries was initially low on the Canadian depth charts and was supposed to represent the United Kingdom, the country of her then-fiancé, Dan Humphries, to compete in the 2006 Olympics. Opting to remain with the Canadian team, he secured a spot on the roster after signing up for bobsled driving school.

She won a silver medal in the mixed bobsled-skeleton team event at the 2008 FIBT World Championships in Altenberg, Germany. After finishing seventh in the 2008–09 Bobsleigh World Cup series, she finished second in the 2009–10 series with one win, two other podium finishes, and an ever top-six finish (in a field of 20). was no less. ) more than eight races. [9]

At the 2010 Winter Olympics, Humphries won the gold medal in the two-woman competition with breakwoman Heather Moyse. The silver medal was won by fellow Canadians Shelley-Ann Brown and Helen Upton. After the final race, Humphries said: “I don’t think I can put it into words yet. We did our job, you know. The goal I set as a little kid, it’s amazing ” [8]

After the 2010 Olympics, Humphries had little success for almost two seasons. She finished on the podium only once during the 2010–11 World Cup series, although her consecutive top-10 finishes allowed her to finish in third place overall. She slipped to fifth place overall in the 2011–12 World Cup series, although she had four podium finishes, including three gold medals.

Husband

Kaillie Humphries: Bobsled| Husband| Where does live

 

Humphries was married to Dan Humphries, a former bobsledder who competed for Great Britain and Canada. [29] The pair divorced before the 2014 Olympics. [30]

In 2015, Humphries met American bobsledder Travis Armbruster, and they became partners in 2016. [31] In September 2019, she and Armbuster were married in California.

Where does live

Callie Humphries is now officially an American.

And just like that, American medal hopes in bobsledding at the Beijing Olympics just got stronger.

The reigning world champion in both monobob and women’s bobsledding was sworn in as a civilian in San Diego on Thursday, ending her long American saga of becoming an American and allowing her to compete in the U.S. at the Olympics. got the right to compete for
He doesn’t have his passport yet, but it’s likely to be little more than a formality. Without a passport, there was almost no chance that Canadian-born Humphries would have been allowed to slide into the Olympics, having made the slide to the US in September 2019 after a long and ongoing dispute with Canadian bobsled officials over claims of verbal abuse. won the right to Mental abuse and harassment. That said, Humphries left the Canadian team to seek a safer work environment.

US Joining the team was no easy decision, especially since she knew it didn’t come with a guarantee of being able to slide for the Americans at the Beijing Games – but it was a move nonetheless that she took to her mental and physical strength. deemed necessary for safety.

She could have chased down the chance to slide for another country in these Olympics, but she had decided long ago that she was going to be an American if she was going to Beijing.

 

 

 

 

 

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